Giverny; fall palette

Choosing a day trip was a challenge – Versailles is the no-brainer, but we had been there. Fontainebleau would have been an excellent choice, but I felt a tug in the direction of Claude Monet’s home in Giverny. We were not disappointed – it was a wonderful experience!

Monet's lovely home in Giverny; our guide, Claudia, is in the lower right side of the frame.

We were hoping we might be allowed to move in...

You’re not allowed to take photos inside the home, but someone sneaked past that rule, so here are photos of the lovely dining room and kitchen from passthepork.wordpress.com:

The kitchen

The dining room - thinking about painting ours bright yellow when we get home!

But, of course, the best of Giverny is the garden. Monet created his from what appears to have been a marshy field, and our guide told us that he took the liberty of diverting a stream in order to make the pond for his water lilies.

The lily pond framed by willows

The CE on the Japanese bridge - Monet was a big collector of Japanese prints, which no doubt influenced his decision to add this bridge.

A garden path: in the spring there is apparently wisteria everywhere, but we were happy with nasturtiums. Gives us a reason to come back!

A Giverny sunflower (Nancy - this is for you!)

Of course, I saved the best for last. There are chickens at Giverny!

Claude was apparently a poultry fan - we saw his painting of turkeys at the Musee d'Orsay today

Monet's "Les Dindons", which is a wonderful-sounding word for turkey!

The photos don’t do it justice, of course – we loved Giverny!

Just don't be thinking about Poulet a la Giverny for dinner tonight!

About polloplayer

Empty nester searching for meaning of life through the occasional chicken epiphany.
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6 Responses to Giverny; fall palette

  1. Katherine says:

    Wow – those are great photos of a beautiful spot. Looking at that lily pond is like looking at one of Monet’s paintings if you squint. I love impressionism, but am I the only one who looks at the paintings and wonders if we’d have this glorious art if they could have fixed near-sightedness and astigmatism in the 19th century?

  2. polloplayer says:

    Chicken Emperor here with Travel Tip #5: Art Appreciation.

    If you are lucky to visit Monet’s home you need to know how to appreciate paintings. Also, if you are determined to visit European museums you will need to know how to identify art. This is done by observing the piece carefully, preferably with your elbow in one hand and the fingers from the other hand tapping gently around the area of your mouth for an extended time (this will give you a professorial air and will distinguish you from the less informed patrons).

    Now identifying the paintings is very easy: If you can tell what it is you are observing an “Old Master”, if not, it is “Impressionist”. If it looks like it would hurt if it fell on you, this is a sculpture, not a painting. I think this is all you really need to know, other than which piece to be looking at in the first place. Again, this is easy: To avoid foolishly appreciating a work that the high-brow critics do not approve of, only stand in front of a piece with a large crowd in front of it, like the Mona Lisa. This crowd following method works well unless the crowd is one of Japanese tourists, in which case they may well be appreciating an exit sign, so be careful there.

    Not only will these techniques enhance your museum experience, they should put you in good position to cash out your 401-k funds when you return home and invest the proceeds in art of your choice.

  3. Tina says:

    Ahhhhh, so beautiful and romantic! I will have to put Giverny on my bucket list.
    And btw, I am loving Dad’s travel tips….the French have really sparked up his sense of humor!

  4. polloamigo says:

    Wonderful pictures. I am sure it was all part of the art expert/CE’s master plan to see the water lillies paintings first.

  5. Angela says:

    Oh, it’s just magical. Beyond gorgeous, thanks for posting the photos. Going to forward this one to Nicole; being the art aficionado that she is. Off to paint everything I own, Yellow….

  6. Nancy says:

    Only Monet would have such sunflowers, I adore it!
    Nancy

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